Monthly Archives: May 2017

Dinner Chez Moi

I loved Elizabeth Bard’s memoirs, Lunch in Paris and Picnic in Provence, so I was very excited to find out she had a new book being published this year.

Dinner Chez Moi: 50 French Secrets to Joyful Eating and EntertainingI finally managed to get my hands on the book, but it took me ages to get through it. Its a simple enough book, although the premise is a little muddled. Its too simple to be an eating manifesto of the French. Although there are recipes. Bard provides 50 “secrets” of a French kitchen. Each secret is numbered, accompanied by a recipe and some thoughts of how that secret has changed her life.

The illustrations are pretty, but I found the book to be lacking in so many ways. It was just so sparse. Maybe its meant to be a beginner’s guide, like Michael Pollan’s simplied Food Rules? I didn’t really learn anything new from the book, nothing I didn’t know before. I do want to try a couple of the recipes from her book once the weather cools down. The yogurt cake and the madeleine cookie recipe.

In a French Kitchen: Tales and Traditions of Everyday Home Cooking in FranceI think the downside for me, was that this book borrowed very heavily from Susan Herrmann Loomis In A French Kitchen. This book provides some wonderful insight, thought and history into a typical French kitchen. Whereas Dinner Chez Moi is an introductory course, In A French Kitchen is the full semester.

Both books provide virtually the same information, one is just much more detailed. Both would make wonderful gifts for your favorite Francophile.

Advertisements

The problem with working in a library

Is that I am constantly reminded of all of the books that I won’t ever get to read. As quickly as I try to read through books now, my to-read list on Goodreads is a bottomless pit. 424 books and counting.

This has been a decent year of reading for me though. 18 books in 5 months. I always start strong in the first couple months of the year, and then by summer I’m struggling to finish a book in two months.

Here are some of the books I read in the recent months:

The Only Street in Paris: Life on the Rue des Martyrs

 

I just finished this one last week. It was…so-so. I really enjoyed the history of the street. Rue des Martyrs is tucked away by Montmontre. It seems like a quiet and simple little street in such a big and bustling city.

 

The Baker's Secret

This one was one of the better historical fiction novels set in Paris that I’ve read. Set during WWII, it focuses on a small little village in France that is under Nazi occupation. The characters were varied and engrossing. I particularly enjoyed the protagonists’s glum nature, although based on the reviews I’ve read, others didn’t feel the same.

 

The Little French Bistro

The only thing I enjoyed about this book is the setting in Brittany. Its an area in France I know virtually nothing about and it was wonderful to learn about some of the unique traits of that region. That said…the story and characters were forced, trite and unrealistic. There were too many characters of similar natures to keep track of and I felt like the protagonist had a habit of always having the magic touch. I hate that in novels. Its one of my biggest pet peeves.
The Almost Nearly Perfect People: Behind the Myth of the Scandinavian Utopia¬†This is apparently the only book I’ve read in the recent months that isn’t set in France. Its a look at the Nordic region of the world, Scandinavia. Its very glib, sarcastic, and offers a unique look at life underneath the happiest-people-in-the-world banner that these countries often find themselves waving. I’ve concluded that there really is no perfect place in the world. Everywhere has its ups and downs. Its really what we do with those ups and downs that determines our own happiness. I do wish I had a print copy of this book. I listened to the audiobook and there are a lot of things I want to go back and re-read.