Book Review: The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The…

Title: The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing by Marie Kondo
Source: Library copy
Publisher: Ten Speed Press
ISBN: 9781607747307

This book has been flying off the shelves at my library system. It’s hard to find a copy in stock and when you place you hold, you’re in the triple digits on a wait list. My first introduction to this book was through a YouTube video highlighting the magical powers of neatly folded clothes in the dresser drawer to maximize space. I should note that the clothes are folded and stacked vertically, so that you can see each and every shirt. They aren’t stacked on top of each other, hiding the ones at the bottom.

After a long, long, long wait, I finally got my hands on a copy of this book and it’s really one of the best books on home organization and decluttering methodologies. Like the author, I too spent a great deal of my life, from early childhood, decluttering, donating and constantly reshuffling objects around my home in an effort to create a tidy space. To be honest, I never really realized why it wasn’t working until I came across this book. What I like best about the KonMari method, as the author calls it, is that unlike magazine and other books, she doesn’t structure her advice around specific layouts. Most tips you find show visuals of people’s homes, but those spaces and sizes are not always appropriate for my approach. I like that she left the home size vague. She talked more about the objects than space. Much of the book was spent on decluttering. Her method is time intensive but sound. You do it all at once. You break it down into categories, but then you declutter everything through that category. Start with clothes. Grab every single piece of clothing item in the house from every room possible. Then sort. If it brings you joy, keep it. If it doesn’t, toss it. It’s a very simple approach. But the bottom line is to keep only objects that bring you joy. My difficulty is with getting rid of paper and certain clothes. Some clothes I paid too much for and only wore a few times, or clothes that are now too big or too small. It feels like a waste of money to get rid of them, but all they do is gather dust and take up space in my closet. My other big obstacle is paperwork. This is where I just shuffle them around from box to box from room to room. I wish I had better knowledge of how to properly dispose of documents since I don’t have ready access to a shredder. But I did proceed with a big purge while reading this book. Its hard not to!

But I cheated. I didn’t really follow her method of working through individual categories. I just went from room to room based on my time availability in the evenings. Doing a major purge like this is so much more different from what I had been doing before. I always have a box in the bedroom for Goodwill donations. I’m always tossing stuff in there. But the box sits in my room for a month or two at a time. While the box fills up, the space I had cleared is filled with something new. Therefore, I was never really decreasing my cluttering. Just moving it around. Going through a major purse as book recommended created some major white spaces in my closets and in my rooms. In fact, it had me nervous that I had lost something important even though I couldn’t really remember what was there in the first place.

She also had a small section on storage. I like that she doesn’t recommend or push for any particular storage device besides that of a basic shoe box. Personally, I’ve gotten very obsessed with these photo boxes from Michael’s over the last five years. I have in almost every cabinet or every shelf in my kitchen and pantry. They are wonderful for storing like items; sauces, pastas, etc. But storage is the absolute last step. The first is to get rid of everything unwanted or unneeded, then find a way to make-do with what is left behind.

In the end, I’ve decreased my extraneous paperwork by more than half, trimmed my wardrobe and updated certain elements to give myself a happier space. There’s less clutter in general around the house, although still more than what I want. I just haven’t had the time to sit down for an intensive purge and organization as the book recommends. You’d really need to devote an entire weekend to get through all the different categories. Although if you work from least sentimental to the really sentimental objects, you’ll have honed in on your criteria for what to keep and what to toss.

There really is a lot of great advice in this tiny little book. The author’s approach is friendly and encouraging but also firm. I could feel her in the room with me when I deciding what to get rid of and what to keep. This book is really more about the psychology of the process of tidying than anything else. It’s a wonderful resource for anyone looking for a way to make their lives a little more streamlined.

© 2015 by Nari of The Novel World. All rights reserved. You can also follow me @TheNovelWorld

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