Book Review: A Study in Scarlet by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

 

A Study in Scarlet by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (Sherlock Holmes Mysteries #1)

121 pages – Penguin Edition

Find this book at your local library

My experiences with Sherlock Holmes have been scattered and never direct. I’ve heard people talk about him, misquote the book (Its Elementary, my dear Watson), and I’ve seen many a TV show that parody or references him (Monk, and a number of Star Trek the Next Generation Episodes).  Most recently, I’ve been obsessing over the BBC’s Sherlock. Meaning, I’ve seen each episode twice and have watched all the special features that Netflix has to offer. However, there’s now going to be a nearly year-long gap until the next (and single) episode of 2015. I figured I might as well try my hand at reading the Sherlock Holmes mysteries to become better acquainted with the story, the characters and some of the mysteries. The BBC series stays ridiculously close to the books, but does an excellent job of modernizing elements of the book, and amending plot twists and character reveals to make the show its own being. It’s a very fine line to balance, especially with a work of literature as popular as the Sherlock Holmes mysteries. Mark Gatiss and Stephan Moffat have done an amazing job though. The first episode is A Study in Pink, linking back to the first book, A Study in Scarlet.

The book starts with the introduction of John Watson to Sherlock Holmes. Both men looking for a flat to share. They wind up at 221B Baker street. Unlike the show, it takes a while before Watson is drawn into Sherlock’s career as a consulting detective. However, the two were a match made for each other right from the start. The book also starts with a mysterious death, the mysterious message Rache, and a set of poisonous pills. Holmes, in the book is just as arrogant as depicted on screen, but I couldn’t hold that against him. I found it kind of endearing. Well, I really found the way Watson wiggled into Holmes’ heart endearing. The two are polar opposites, but make for a great team. The book was definitely not what I was expecting though. Its broken down into two parts. Part one was the mysterious death and Holmes’ reveal of the murderer. Part two provided the back story to the murder. That part was very confusing, long-winded and bizarre. Particularly its depiction of Mormonism at its worst with power-hungry elders. Told through Watson’s point of view, we never really pick up or know what clues lead Sherlock to his great deductions. That part kind of irks me. He just announces information as facts and we, as the readers have to accept it as the gospel truth. The mystery was resolved rather neatly, but this departure from England at the beginning of part two was just plain odd. I wasn’t overly impressed with the book, but then again, I did jump from the show to the book with lots of mix-up Sherlock representations in my head, so I’m sure my expectations were higher than they should have been. I do plan on reading more of his work though. It’s so well-regarded, that it seems silly not to give them another chance. Mostly, I just want to get to Moriarty.

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One response to “Book Review: A Study in Scarlet by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

  1. I just finished A Study in Scarlet, having decided to read through all the Sherlock Holmes starting with the first. I particularly liked the way it was set up as murder with the motive as revenge, and Holmes’ solve, then the Part 2 back story, which was fascinating to me anyway, as we totally get the motive this way, and understand it as well as the historical information.

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