Daily Archives: February 10, 2011

You Found Me How?

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I think the fad for these search engine recaps has pretty much passed, but I’ll try to revive it. I’m looking through my WordPress collection of search terms used to direct people to my blog, and I couldn’t help but chuckle at most of them. The funniest thing, is that the #1 & #2 searches bringing people to my site, are my Rory Gilmore Reading List & Diary of A Wimpy Kid reviews respectively. #3 would probably be reviews of Al Capone Does My Shirts.

These, though, are some of the funnier search terms used in the past week. Although most of these require some sort of color commentary, I can’t really think of anything clever to say. I leave you to come up with your own quips!

In no particular order:

  • a report on the massacre and its aftermath by seymour m. hersh
  • emily lorelai richard
  • why no oranges clean program
  • novel of the world
  • leslie scalapino, dahlia’s iris, p. 104
  • adult storyline
  • a tree grows in brooklyn food
  • movies that show kids eating junk food
  • bite me sf
  • magazines like geek
  • information of jane austen’s life (15 pages)
  • world easy email address name
  • dismas hardy corned beef hash and eggs recipe
  • fiction book about soccer mom on painkillers
  • awakening desire, passion, impulsive action, love, all the subjects that had, until then, been hidden
  • thenobelworld.com
  • novel by shirley something

Pygmalion – Review

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Pygmalion: A Romance in 5 Acts by Bernard Shaw

Age: Adult

 Eliza Doolittle is just a lowly flower girl on the streets of London when she happens across Henry Higgins and Colonel Pickering, two of the world’s most renowned linguists. With their help, Eliza learns to alter not only her speaking patterns, but her behavior and way of thinking as well. A play, with five acts carries us through Eliza’s transformation from a guttersnipe, to a lady of esteemed worth.

Anyone who has seen My Fair Lady, is already familiar with this story. My Fair Lady is based on Pygmalion and very little of the text has been altered for the movie. The only changes are the musical renditions thrown into the movie.  The whole time I was reading the play, I kept pausing for the songs that I know so well from the movie. Having seen My Fair Lady about 50x in my lifetime, I have a fondness for Rex Harrison’s Henry Higgins. I’m not sure I would feel the same about him having only read the play. Henry Higgins is a bully. He is very self-centered and negligent of people’s feelings. Through the playwright’s notes, we see that Henry Higgins is still a softy under his harsh demeanor. His love of linguistics prevents him from being able to really appreciate anything else in his life. Eliza’s speech patterns are grating to the ear, but her lines are the most fun to read aloud in attempts to mimic her cockney accent. Her character is naive and innocent, but still intelligent. Despite her transformation, she remains aware of who she is and where she came from.

The play Pygmalion is based on the Greek myth of the same name. The myth goes as follows:

In Greek mythology, Pygmalion was a king of the island of Cyprus and a sculptor. He spent many years carving an ivory statue of a woman more beautiful than any living female.

Pygmalion became fascinated by his sculpture and fell in love with it. He pretended it was an actual woman. He brought it presents and treated it as if it were alive. However, the statue could not respond to his attentions, and Pygmalion became miserable. Finally, he prayed to Aphrodite, the goddess of love, to bring him a woman like his statue. Aphrodite did even better. She brought the statue to life. Pygmalion married this woman, often called Galatea, who gave birth to a daughter (some versions of the story say the child was a boy).
Read more:

Pygmalion – Myth Encyclopedia – mythology, Greek, story, life, king http://www.mythencyclopedia.com/Pr-Sa/Pygmalion.html#ixzz1DP7mUTPq

The similarities between the myth and play are endless. Eliza Doolittle is Higgins’ own statue brought to life. Even Mrs. Higgins, Henry’s mom, comments on the two men playing with their “living doll.” Henry instills in Eliza a new perspective, a new meaning and a new validity. The play was written in the early 20th Century, and is still a strong piece of literary work.

I particularly liked my edition of the play, because it came with a thoughtful introduction, as well as a preface to the play written by Shaw himself. Once the play ends, there is an exposition written further expounding on the themes and social commentaries noted in the play.

Pygmalion: A Romance in Five Acts
Bernard Shaw
Penguin Classics, 1916 (first publication)
133 pages
 
Book 7 of 2011

**************************************

Find this book at your library

 

Pygmalion: A Romance in 5 Acts by Bernard Shaw

Age: Adult

Eliza Doolittle is just a lowly flower girl on the streets of London when she happens across Henry Higgins and Colonel Pickering, two of the world’s most renowned linguists. With their help, Eliza learns to alter not only her speaking patterns, but her behavior and way of thinking as well. A play, with five acts carries us through Eliza’s transformation from a guttersnipe, to a lady of esteemed worth.

Anyone who has seen My Fair Lady, is already familiar with this story. My Fair Lady is based on Pygmalion and very little of the text has been altered for the movie. The only changes are the musical renditions thrown into the movie. Having seen My Fair Lady about 50x in my lifetime, I have a fondness for Rex Harrison’s Henry Higgins. I’m not sure I would feel the same about him having only read the play. Henry Higgins is a bully. He is very self-centered and negligent of people’s feelings. Through the playwright’s notes, we see that Henry Higgins is still a softy under his harsh demeanor. His love of linguistics prevents him from being able to really appreciate anything else in his life.

The play Pygmalion is based on the Greek myth of the same name. The myth goes as follows:

In Greek mythology, Pygmalion was a king of the island of Cyprus and a sculptor. He spent many years carving an ivory statue of a woman more beautiful than any living female.

Pygmalion became fascinated by his sculpture and fell in love with it. He pretended it was an actual woman. He brought it presents and treated it as if it were alive. However, the statue could not respond to his attentions, and Pygmalion became miserable. Finally, he prayed to Aphrodite, the goddess of love, to bring him a woman like his statue. Aphrodite did even better. She brought the statue to life. Pygmalion married this woman, often called Galatea, who gave birth to a daughter (some versions of the story say the child was a boy).
Read more: Pygmalion – Myth Encyclopedia – mythology, Greek, story, life, king http://www.mythencyclopedia.com/Pr-Sa/Pygmalion.html#ixzz1DP7mUTPq

The similarities between the myth and play are endless. Eliza Doolittle is Higgins’ own statue brought to life. Even Mrs. Higgins, Henry’s mom, comments on the two men playing with their “living doll.” Henry instills in Eliza a new perspective, a new meaning and a new validity. The play was written in the early 20th Century, and is still a strong piece of literary work.

I particularly liked my edition of the play, because it came with a thoughtful introduction, as well as a preface to the play written by Shaw himself. Once the play ends, there is an exposition written further expounding on the themes and social commentaries noted in the play.

Pygmalion: A Romance in Five Acts

Find this

Bernard Shaw

Penguin Classics, 1916 (first publication)

133 pages