Category Archives: Books

Book Review: The Penelopiad by Margaret Atwood

The Penelopiad

The Penelopiad by Margaret Atwood
Source: My Copy
2015 Reading Challenge categories

  • Written by a woman
  • A book that can be read in a day
  • A book a friend recommended

Through Homer’s epic The Odyssey, what we know of Penelope is that she is the faithful and clever wife of Odysseus. She is the wife who remains loyal and devoted to her husband after a twenty-year separation. Ten years for the Trojan War, and the following ten years it takes of Odysseus to find his way back home. Throughout her time, many suitors barge into her home in the hopes of marrying her and laying claim to all of her wealth and possessions.

The Penelopiad follows the same story, but told through the eyes and voice of Penelope. The story is told by Penelope in the afterlife (Hades) centuries after her death. I”m still unsure how I feel about this. It allowed for a modern tone & colloquialisms, but it still felt out of place with when the Odyssey took place. I think I went into this book expecting is told concurrently with the Odyssey rather than a retelling many eons later. I learned that Odysseus is a charming ass, but we already knew that. But he is only one of the few people who listens to Penelope and treats her with respect. The chapters told through Penelope’s voice are separated by chapters told through the 12 maids who were murdered by Odysseus upon his return to his palace. Although they were murder under the premise of their disloyalty to Penelope, early on we find out that it was Penelope who encouraged them to mix and mingle with the suitors, to bad-mouth their mistress in order to find out their plans. Penelope didn’t reveal her plan to Odysseus before the murder, so thus, the injustice was carried out. I liked the chapters of the maid’s point of view the best I think. They varied from prose, to song, to a trial before a judge. The injustice of their deaths was very creatively done.

National Readathon Day – Saturday 1/24/2015

Readathon (image courtesy of Penguin Randon House)

Saturday January 24th has been bookmarked as the first ever National Readathon Day, organized by The National Book Foundation, GoodReads, Mashable and Penguin Random House.

You can read the full blurb by Penguin Random House on their blog here.

From the site:

You can get involved by joining readers across America in a marathon reading session on Saturday, January 24. From Noon – 4 PM in our respective time zones, we will sit and read a book in our own home, library, school or bookstore.

Get started now by creating your own Firstgiving Fundraising page, and inviting friends and family to donate, or visit our Frequently Asked Questions page for more information.

The Hobbit: Or There & Back Again (JRR Tolkien)

The hobbit, or, There and back again

The Hobbit (or There and Back Again) by JRR Tolkien

Library Copy

2015 Reading Challenge categories:

  1. A book that became a movie
  2. A book with nonhuman characters
  3. A book with magic

As a young hobbit, Bilbo Baggins finds himself immersed in an adventure of unknown dangers after being mistaken for a burglar by a troupe of dwarves seeking to return to their homeland. Brought into the group as the fourteenth member by Gandalf the Grey Wizard, Bilbo finds not only adventure, but a host of new friends, experiences and levels of bravery that he didn’t think could extend past the warm comforts of his hobbit hole.

What is there to say about the Hobbit that hasn’t been said before? I will openly admit that I wasn’t 100% aware that this book was written for children by Tolkien. I’d seen it shelved in the children’s fiction shelves, but because of the year it was written, I didn’t think that children were the primary audience. That being said, the book is surprisingly and wonderfully kid-friendly, albeit a challenging read with difficult vocabulary, concepts and an intriguing menu of characters from the dragon Smaug, to the elves to the Lakemen. This book is a great bridge for those delving into the Harry Potter books, but aren’t quite ready for the scary arch it takes sometime after The Goblet of Fire. Although, I did find it odd that in the entire book, there is not one single female character. I was more than halfway through the book when I realized that. It didn’t make the book any less interesting or well written. But it is an interesting note.

Other thoughts. The book struck a fine balance between scary, suspense, humor and adventure. There were some slow parts, and parts of the Battle of Five Armies felt rushed. Smaug’s demise wasn’t as dramatic as I thought it would have been, especially since the dwarves had no part of it. The chapter titled Riddles in the Dark was a good introduction to Gollum and the one ring designed to rule them all. It’s funny how easily Tolkien glossed over the powers and the weight of the ring in this book. It’s hardly worth remembering except that it helped Bilbo get out of a few scrapes and help rescue his friends along the way.

Right now, I feel very ready to tackle the Lord of the Rings trilogy. I read the first a long time ago, and my memory of it is very vague. Quite possibly because I skimmed so much of it. Tolkien can be very Dickensian. The Hobbit was nicely spaced with songs, riddles, illustrations and maps (apparently all drawn by Tolkien). These bits helped break up the monotony of the story. Now that I’ve finished the Hobbit, I’m not ready to leave the world of Middle Earth. And I do believe that a trilogy is one of the items on the 2015 Reading Challenge.

New Year, New News

I hope everyone had an an amazing New Year holiday! I’ll be jump-starting this year with my category of the Cybils Shortlist titles for Easy Readers & Early Chapter Books. I won’t be posting reviews until after February though. Although I should have a review of The Hobbit up pretty soon.

The round 1 judges spent countless hours reading, reviewing and discussing the merits of these books (among others). They did a great job narrowing down the selection for my round 2 group.

View this list, along with their commentaries on the Cybils website

Easy Readers

Extraordinary Warren: A Super Chicken by Sarah Dillard (Aladdin)
Okay, Andy! by Maxwell Eaton (Blue Apple Books)
Clara and Clem Under the Sea by Ethan Long (Penguin USA)
Pigsticks and Harold and the Incredible Journey by Alex Milway (Candlewick Press)
The Ice Cream Shop: A Steve and Wessley Reader by Jennifer E. Morris (Scholastic)
Inch and Roly and the Sunny Day Scare by Melissa Wiley (Simon Spotlight)
My New Friend Is So Fun! by Mo Willems (Disney-Hyperion)

Early Chapter Books

Violet Mackerel’s Possible Friend by Anna Branford (Atheneum)
The Chicken Squad: The First Misadventure by Doreen Cronin (Atheneum)
The Lion Who Stole My Arm by Nicola Davies (Candlewick Press)
Dory Fantasmagory by Abby Hanlon (Dial Books)
Lulu and the Rabbit Next Door by Hilary McKay (Albert Whitman & Company)
Like Carrot Juice on a Cupcake by Julie Sternberg (Abrams Books for Young Readers)
Lulu’s Mysterious Mission by Judith Viorst (Atheneum)

Book Review: How Paris Became Paris by Joan DeJean

How Paris Became Paris: The Invention of the Modern City

How Paris Became Paris: The Invention of the Modern City by Joan DeJean

Source: library copy

Genre: non-fiction

How Paris Became Paris is a wonderful book for anyone interested in a brief history to the City of Light. DeJean’s book covers a lot of ground, focusing on the 17th century developments happening in the city. However, she doesn’t go in as much depth as say a history book. Her writing style is much more casual, although you’ll be inundated with interesting facts about the structuring of the city of Paris.

She starts with the Pont Neuf bridge, and from there, the chapters discuss the ripple effects of this bridge on French social society. The invention of this bridge quite literally paved the way for modern French interactions, fashion as well as development throughout the city. The widened bridge became the first in Europe to be of such a width as to allow the public to parade through the streets. It is as a result of this bridge, that the French started leaving their homes to go for walks. These walks led to the necessity of being fashionably dressed. The need for fashion led to the invention of clothing stores and the hobby known as shopping. The availability of shopping allowed for people of all class caste systems to be able to dress and intermingle with people above and below their rank. This intermingling led to many more social developments, particularly in relation to women’s freedoms.

The chapters have a very easy flow to them, picking up where the previous one concluded. I found them to be the perfect length. Neither too long, nor too short. There are a number of illustrations, photographs and maps dotted throughout the chapters to break up the text and help highlight the author’s opinions. The author has a clear love for the city, and it strongly reflected in her writing. Paris can do no wrong and had apparently been an inspiration to other European capitals over the centuries. I’d strongly recommend this to anyone planning a trip to Paris. Having some historical insight will make the tourist stops that much more meaningful.

A Jane Austen Book Guide

I found this gem on Tumblr from the Austin Public Library. Apparently it was Jane Austen’s birthday on Dec. 16th. What a fun way to celebrate! I now have even more books to add to my to-read list.

photo

  1. Longbourn by Jo Baker
  2. Jane Austen and the Canterbury Tale by Stephanie Barron
  3. Pride & Prescience by Carrie Bebris
  4. Death Comes to Pemberley by PD James
  5. Pride & Prejudice & Zombies by Seth Grahame-Smith
  6. For Darkness Shows the Stars by Diana Peterfreund
  7. Mr. Darcy Takes A Wife by Linda Berdoll
  8. The Perfect Bride for Mr. Darcy by Mary Simonsen
  9. Sass & Serendipity by Jennifer Zigler
  10. Prom & Prejudice by Elizabeth Eulberg
  11. Prada & Prejudice by Mandy Hubbard
  12. Emma adapted by Nancy Baker
  13. Sense & Sensibility adapted by Nancy Baker
  14. Pride & Prejudice adapted by Nancy Baker
  15. Northanger Abbey adapted by Nancy Baker
  16. Bridget Jones’ Diary by Helen Fielding
  17. Northanger Abbey by Val McDermid
  18. Sense & Sensibility by Joanna Trollope
  19. Lost in Austen
  20. Bride & Prejudice
  21. The Jane Austen Bookclub by Karen Joy Fowler
  22. Austenland by Shannon Hale

2015 Reading Challenge

This 2015 Reading Challenge complied by PopSugar seems very feasible, for me at least. I’ve never been good with reading challenges, but I think I could accidently read a number of the books on this checklist. That’s another plus, is that its a checklist form. There’s nothing I love better than checking something off a list. I think I might print out a number of these to pass out at the library this month. What reading challenges are you signing up for next year?

Book Review: A Study in Scarlet by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

 

A Study in Scarlet by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (Sherlock Holmes Mysteries #1)

121 pages – Penguin Edition

Find this book at your local library

My experiences with Sherlock Holmes have been scattered and never direct. I’ve heard people talk about him, misquote the book (Its Elementary, my dear Watson), and I’ve seen many a TV show that parody or references him (Monk, and a number of Star Trek the Next Generation Episodes).  Most recently, I’ve been obsessing over the BBC’s Sherlock. Meaning, I’ve seen each episode twice and have watched all the special features that Netflix has to offer. However, there’s now going to be a nearly year-long gap until the next (and single) episode of 2015. I figured I might as well try my hand at reading the Sherlock Holmes mysteries to become better acquainted with the story, the characters and some of the mysteries. The BBC series stays ridiculously close to the books, but does an excellent job of modernizing elements of the book, and amending plot twists and character reveals to make the show its own being. It’s a very fine line to balance, especially with a work of literature as popular as the Sherlock Holmes mysteries. Mark Gatiss and Stephan Moffat have done an amazing job though. The first episode is A Study in Pink, linking back to the first book, A Study in Scarlet.

The book starts with the introduction of John Watson to Sherlock Holmes. Both men looking for a flat to share. They wind up at 221B Baker street. Unlike the show, it takes a while before Watson is drawn into Sherlock’s career as a consulting detective. However, the two were a match made for each other right from the start. The book also starts with a mysterious death, the mysterious message Rache, and a set of poisonous pills. Holmes, in the book is just as arrogant as depicted on screen, but I couldn’t hold that against him. I found it kind of endearing. Well, I really found the way Watson wiggled into Holmes’ heart endearing. The two are polar opposites, but make for a great team. The book was definitely not what I was expecting though. Its broken down into two parts. Part one was the mysterious death and Holmes’ reveal of the murderer. Part two provided the back story to the murder. That part was very confusing, long-winded and bizarre. Particularly its depiction of Mormonism at its worst with power-hungry elders. Told through Watson’s point of view, we never really pick up or know what clues lead Sherlock to his great deductions. That part kind of irks me. He just announces information as facts and we, as the readers have to accept it as the gospel truth. The mystery was resolved rather neatly, but this departure from England at the beginning of part two was just plain odd. I wasn’t overly impressed with the book, but then again, I did jump from the show to the book with lots of mix-up Sherlock representations in my head, so I’m sure my expectations were higher than they should have been. I do plan on reading more of his work though. It’s so well-regarded, that it seems silly not to give them another chance. Mostly, I just want to get to Moriarty.

Nonfiction Reading Challenge 2014

I’ve been on a big non-fiction kick lately. I’m mostly interested in history right now. As well as all things European or British. (We can thank the BBC Sherlock for this obsession). I think my obsession with England is overtaking my obsession with France. In my rather insane desire to learn about all things Europe, I’ve been scouring the websites for quality nonfiction books. I want to learn something when I read. Actual facts and figures, not just opinion pieces or funny anecdotes. I feel ready to step away from fiction from a while and really give my brain a challenge. Hence, the Nonfiction Reading Challenge, someone reminiscent of my Dewey Decimal Reading Challenge I attempted a few years back. I’m quite tardy in signing up, but better late than never. Here’s hoping I find some interesting titles to add to my list in the meantime.

There are 4 levels for the challenge. We’ll see where I wind up by the end of the year.

Dilettante–Read 1-5 non-fiction books

Explorer–Read 6-10

Seeker–Read 11-15

Master–Read 16-20

Book Review: The Red Necklace by Sally Gardner

The Red Necklace (French Revolution, #1)
The Red Necklace by Sally Gardner
Audio book: Narrator Tom Hiddleston
YA – Historical Fiction

Set during the tumultuous times of the French Revolution in the 18th century, this novel tells the tale of two unlikely teens caught up in the whirlwind of confusion, and tensions between the aristocrats and the peasants in the streets.

The publisher’s synopsis:

The story of a remarkable boy called Yann Margoza; Tetu the dwarf, his friend and mentor; Sido, unloved daughter of a foolish Marquis; and Count Kalliovski, Grand Master of a secret society, who has half the aristocracy in thrall to him, and wants Yann dead. Yann is spirited away to London but three years later, when Paris is gripped by the bloody horrors of the Revolution, he returns, charged with two missions: to find out Kalliovski’s darkest deeds and to save Sido from the guillotine.

Although this is a YA novel, I wouldn’t label it as a romance novel. Although there is a strong connection between Yann and Sido, it is definitely not at the center of the novel. The novel is more about the tensions in Paris, the fervor spreading across the city as hatred for the rich is mounting and mounting. Sido is swept up in the middle of it all due to her Marquis father, who doesn’t even want her around. Cound Kalliovski is vile, cruel, and wants Sido as a wife. But then there is the wonderous Yann. He needs to figure out a way to save Sido from two very distinct types of death. Marriage to the count and the guillotine. The book itself is a bit iffy on the facts of the revolution, but the revolution is really just a backdrop to the interwoven story between Sido, Yann and the count. There were a number of plot twists that I anticipated, but just as many that I didn’t see coming. There is a magical realism element with Yann’s ability to see threads of light hovering around objects and people around him, allowing him to telepathically move things at a whim.  The novel is well-paced and I like the variety of characters that are introduced. Gardner doesn’t dwell too long on any one element of the novel, but I didn’t feel rushed through the novel either. For reader’s advisory, I think this could be an easy sell for boys, despite the girly cover art. A book about death, revolutions, and a man who can control the entire city of Paris with blackmail and murder threats isn’t an easy book to turn down. This is also book one in a series. Book two is The Silver Blade.

Narration:

I was lucky enough to listen to the audio book narrated by Tom Hiddleston. His narration is flawless. His accents, the voices are all so unique, he really does bring the book to life. His menacing Count Kalliovski that he portrays is spine-tingling. I think he’s narrated one other audio book to date, a James Bond novel. I’m eager to listen to that one next.

© 2014 by Nari of The Novel World. All rights reserved. You can also follow me @TheNovelWorld